18th International Congress Themed Courses

18th International Congress Streaming Content
for Themed Courses

 

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Session 2101: Gene therapy for Parkinson’s disease and movement disorders

Chairs Jeffrey Kordower
Chicago, IL, USA
C. Warren Olanow
New York, NY, USA

Basic principles of gene therapy
Dawn Bowles
Durham, NC, USA

Tropic factor delivery with gene therapy
Jeffrey Kordower
Chicago, IL, USA

DA/DOPA delivery with gene therapy in Parkinson’s disease
Tomas Björklund
Lund, Sweden

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

1. Understand the challenges of gene therapy, the procedures currently applied and the outcome of first studies
2. Discuss the current status of gene delivery of trophic factors
3. Identify the challenges and first strategies of DA/DOPA delivery with gene therapy

Session 2203: Dyskinesias associated with old and new therapies for Parkinson’s disease

Chairs: M. Angela Cenci
Lund, Sweden
Olivier Rascol
Toulouse, France

Dyskinesias as a manifestation of maladaptive striatal plasticity
M. Angela Cenci
Lund, Sweden

The serotonin system in human L-dopa-induced and graft-induced dyskinesias: The state of the art
Paola Piccini
London, United Kingdom

Functional brain networks in Parkinson’s dyskinesias
Andrea Kühn
Berlin, Germany

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

1. Review recent experimental literature on the pathophysiological adaptations of striatal neurons in treatment-induced dyskinesias
2. Describe recent findings on the serotonin system in L-DOPA-induced and graft-induced dyskinesias
3. List network-levels changes associated with treatment-induced dyskinesias

Session 2204: Improving clinical translation of cell therapy for movement disorders

Chairs: Erwan Bezard
Bordeaux, France
Hakan Widner
Lund, Sweden

Experiences from the Transeuro multicenter clinical transplantation trial with fetal cells in Parkinson’s disease
Hakan Widner
Lund, Sweden

Cell transplantation beyond Parkinson’s disease: Experiences from the MSA trial
Young Sohn
Seoul, Korea

Cell transplantation in Huntington’s disease
Anne-Catherine Bachoud-Levi
Creteil, France

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

1. Understand the specifics of cell transplant trials (whatever the cell source)
2. Consider MSA as proof-of-concept disease for future Parkinson application
3. Understand the progress of cell transplant trial in Huntington’s disease

Session 2411: How to avoid stem cell tourism and misuse of cell and gene therapies

Chairs: Ann Marie Janson Lang
Stockholm, Sweden
Wolfgang Oertel
Marburg, Germany

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

1. Understand the potential risks of misuse of stem cell and gene therapies
2. Advise and educate patients on the risks of uncontrolled stem cell and gene therapies
3. Advocate on behalf of patients with regard to misuse of cell and gene therapies

Session 3101: Cell therapy for Parkinson’s disease

Chairs: Anders Björklund
Lund, Sweden
Olle Lindvall
Lund, Sweden

Lessons learned from open-label cell transplantation studies
Roger Barker
Cambridge, United Kingdom

Reflections on sham-controlled clinical trials using fetal cells: Fifteen years later
Stanley Fahn
New York, NY, USA

Prospects of using stem cell-derived cells for clinical transplantation
Olle Lindvall
Lund, Sweden

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

1. Identify the different types of cell therapy available for Parkinson’s disease research in progress and the future
2. Identify the current state and future of transplantation therapy in Parkinson’s disease
3. Identify the effectiveness of transplants and avoid side effects and investigate how Parkinson’s disease interacts with transplantation

Session 3203: Continuous dopaminergic stimulation (CDS)-based therapies for Parkinson’s disease

Chairs: Erik Danielsen
Aarhus, Denmark
Tove Henriksen
Copenhagen, Denmark

CDS in Parkinson’s disease: When do we need to start?
Santiago Perez Lloret
Buenos Aires, Argentina

New ways of delivering oral and non-infusional CDS
Per Odin
Bremerhaven, Germany

Dopaminergic infusion therapies
Dag Nyholm
Uppsala, Sweden

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

1. Understand what we have learned from animal and human studies about how the continuous dopaminergic stimulation might influence motor fluctuations in early versus late Parkinson’s disease
2. Learn and appreciate the rationale for established and in-development oral and transdermal methods for CDS via strategies utilizing continuous drug delivery outlining effect on motor, non-motor symptoms and quality of life in Parkinson’s disease
3. Learn and understand the effects of dopaminergic treatments delivered by infusion (subcutaneous, intra-jejunal, intravenous) on motor and non-motor symptoms and quality of life in Parkinson’s disease

Session 3204: Development and maintenance of the nigrostriatal dopamine pathway: Novel insights and therapeutic targets

Chairs: Ernest Arenas
Stockholm, Sweden
Thomas Perlmann
Stockholm, Sweden

Genetic factors governing the neuronal dopaminergic phenotype
Ernest Arenas
Stockholm, Sweden

Nurr-1 role in the development and maintenance of dopamine neurons and Parkinson’s disease treatment
Anders Björklund
Lund, Sweden

The role of trophic factors in the maintenance of nigrostriatal neurons and Parkinson’s disease treatment
Krystof Bankiewicz
San Francisco, CA, USA

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

1. Understand how dopamine neurons differentiate, and how this process can be controlled in the lab
2. Learn how Nurr-1 modulates the development and maintenance of DA neurons and recognize its role as a therapeutic option for Parkinson’s disease
3. Identify the role of GDNF and BDNF in the maintenance of nigrostriatal neurons and their role as Parkinson’s disease therapeutic options

Session 3515: Examples of video-documented outcomes of cell and gene therapy

Peter LeWitt
West Bloomfield, MI, USA
Niall Quinn
London, United Kingdom

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

1. Understand and appreciate the potential clinical benefits and pitfalls of gene therapy in
movement disorders
2. Appreciate the clinical potential of the cell therapies
3. Appreciate the potential benefits and hazards of gene and cell therapies in neurodegenerative disease and movement disorders

Session 4203: New developments in Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS)

Chairs: Karen Østergaard
Aarhus, Denmark
Stig Rehncrona
Lund, Sweden

DBS in Parkinson’s disease: How early to start?
Günther Deuschl
Kiel, Germany

New targets and new indications for DBS in movement disorders
Joachim Krauss
Hannover, Germany

Adverse effects and long term safety
Michael Okun
Gainesville, FL, USA

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

1. Discuss the best moment to consider DBS in Parkinson’s disease patients
2. Understand the recent advances in the new surgical targets and potential new therapeutic indications for DBS in movement disorders
3. Discuss the frequency and relevancy of adverse effects and long term safety of DBS

Session 4204: Gene silencing for movement disorders

Chairs: Jan Aasly
Trondheim, Norway
Nicole Déglon
Lausanne, Switzerland

Dampening the toxic gain of function of autosomal dominant genes
Blair Leavitt
Vancouver, BC, Canada

Gene silencing in Huntington’s disease
Nicole Déglon
Lausanne, Switzerland

Gene silencing for other neurodegenerative diseases
Henry Paulson
Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

1. Understand approaches that can be used to counteract the effects of mutated proteins in
autosomal dominant movement disorders
2. Understand various approaches for silencing the abnormal gene in Huntington’s disease
3. Learn about the status of gene silencing in other neurodegenerative diseases in animal models and/or humans

Session 5204: Development of new treatments for targeting abnormal aggregation of alpha-synuclein

Chairs: Wassilios Meissner
Bordeaux, France
Brit Mollenhauer
Kassel, Germany

Results from preclinical proof of concept studies
Tiago Fleming Outeiro
Lisbon, Portugal

Which biomarkers may be useful as objective outcome measures for clinical trials?
Takahiko Tokuda
Kyoto, Japan

Multiple system atrophy as a model for clinical proof of concept studies
Wassilios Meissner
Bordeaux, France

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

1. Describe the results of preclinical proof of concept studies targeting alpha-synuclein
2. Identify potential biomarkers that may serve as objective outcomes for future disease modification or neuroprotection trials
3. Evaluate the usefulness of the clinical model of multiple system atrophy for future disease-modification or neuroprotection trials in synucleinopathies

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