17th International Congress of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders

Teaching Courses DVD-ROM

17th International Congress Teaching Course DVD

MDS is now offering a selection of its Congress educational sessions on DVD, including Teaching Courses and Themed Sessions. Each DVD includes slides, audio and video. The Teaching Course DVD will also include PDFs of accompanying syllabi.

Pricing: MDS Members: $100 USD; MDS Non- Members: $200 USD

*Note each DVD is a DVD-ROM. Read Hardware and System Requirement.

The 17th International Congress Teaching Course DVD includes the following sessions:

Session 2308: Movement disorders and epilepsy

Chairs:
Sam Berkovic
Heidelberg West, Australia
Carlo Colosimo
Rome, Italy

The relationship between myoclonus and epilepsy: New insights from neurophysiological and genetic studies in myoclonus dystonia and familial cortical tremor

Akio Ikeda
Kyoto, Japan

The relationship between paroxsyzmal dyskinesia and epilepsy: Lessons from recent genetic advances

Ingrid Scheffer
Melbourne, Australia

Update on the diagnosis and genetics of the progressive myoclonic epilepsies

Sam Berkovic
Heidelberg West, Australia

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Understand the relationship between myoclonus and epilepsy
  2. Recognize the clinical and genetic overlap between paroxsysmal movement disorders (especially the paroxysmal dyskinesias) and epilepsy
  3. Learn an approach to the differential diagnosis and investigation of a patient with the syndrome of progressive myoclonic epilepsy and/or progressive myoclonic ataxia
Session 2309: Biomarkers for early Parkinson’s disease

Chairs:
Charles Adler
Scottsdale, AZ, USA
Daniela Berg
Tübingen, Germany

Clinical biomarkers

Charles Adler
Scottsdale, AZ, USA

Genetic, biochemical and tissue biomarkers

Pascal Derkinderen
Nantes, France

Imaging biomarkers

Klaus Seppi
Innsbruck, Austria

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Recognize the importance of the pre-motor phase of Parkinson’s disease and to understand how to evaluate these non-motor symptoms
  2. Review the genetic, biochemical (CSF and blood), and tissue biomarkers that are associated with Parkinson’s disease
  3. Describe the spectrum of neuroimaging methods that may be used to diagnose early Parkinson’s disease and to understand their limitations
Session 3314: Movement disorders emergencies

Chairs:
K.Ray Chaudhuri
London, United Kingdom
Louis Tan
Singapore

Emergencies in hypokinetic disorders

Renato Puppi Munhoz
Curitiba, Brazi

Emergencies in hyperkinetic disorders

Steven Frucht
New York, NY, USA

Emergencies in surgically treated movement disorders patients

Rianne Esselink
Nijmegen, Netherlands

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Recognize and define management strategies for neuroleptic malignant syndrome, parkinsonism hyperpyrexia syndrome, and serotonin syndrome
  2. Recognize and define management strategies for status dystonicus, acute dystonic reaction, and selected causes of acute choreas, myoclonus and tics
  3. Recognize and define management strategies for emergent complications in DBS- treated patients with movement disorders
Session 3315: DBS in movement disorders

Chairs:
Neil Mahant
Sydney, Australia
Philip Starr
San Francisco, CA, USA

DBS for Parkinson’s disease: Non-motor outcomes and long-term results

Jens Volkmann
Würzburg, Germany

DBS for dystonia, tremor and other hyperkinetic disorders

Michele Tagliati
Los Angeles, CA, USA

Mechanisms of DBS and recent technical developments

Chung-Chin Kuo
Taipei, Taiwan

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Recognize the indications, motor and non-motor benefits, potential side effects and long-term outcome of DBS for Parkinson’s disease
  2. Understand the indications, benefits, possible side effects, and long-term outcome of DBS for dystonia, essential tremor, and other hyperkinetic disorders
  3. Understand the recent advances in the mechanisms of action of DBS and in technical developments such as close-loop stimulation
Session 4315: Recognizing and understanding hyperkinetic movement disorders

Chairs:
Hubert Fernandez
Cleveland, OH, USA
Ainhi Ha
Sydney, Australia

Distinguishing clinical features of hyperkinetic movement disorders

Sarah Teixeira Camargos
Belo Horizonte, Brazil

Pathophysiology and molecular pathology of hyperkinetic disorders

Ryuji Kaji
Tokushima City, Japan

Treatment options in hyperkinetic disorders

Steven Frucht
New York, NY, USA

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Identify the distinctive features allowing to distinguish tremor, chorea, dystonia, tics, myoclonus and stereotypies, and to recognize other motor abnormalities that may occur in association with these disorders
  2. Highlight how the motor, sensorimotor, associative and limbic basal ganglia loops are affected by the different hyperkinetic syndromes compared to hypokinetic syndromes, and to illustrate how dysfunction at the molecular level can entail circuit dysfunction that leads to hyperkinetic phenomenology
  3. Review the medical, rehabilitation and surgical options available to treat hyperkinetic disorders, to distinguish general from specific treatment options, and to highlight available guidelines and treatment algorithms
Session 4316: Clinical examination in movement disorders

Chairs:
Rick Stell
Perth, Australia
David Williams
Melbourne, Australia

Examination tips in tremor

John O’Sullivan
Coorparoo, Australia

Examination pearls in parkinsonism

David Williams
Melbourne, Australia

Examination highlights in hyperkinetic movement disorders

Mohit Bhatt
Mumbai, India

Learning Objectives:
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Utilize a range of bedside techniques to examine, characterize and differentiate tremors
  2. Identify key characteristics of different parkinsonian conditions through the clinical examination
  3. Use strategic examination techniques to assist in the differential diagnosis of hyperkinetic movement disorders
Session 5311: Imaging techniques in degenerative movement disorders: A window on the pathologist’s world

Chairs:
Daniela Berg
Tübingen, Germany
Antonio Strafella
Toronto, ON, Canada

The role of magnetic resonance imaging techniques in neurodegenerative diseases

Martin McKeown
Vancouver, BC, Canada

Transcranial sonography in Parkinson’s disease

Daniela Berg
Tübingen, Germany

PET receptor imaging in movement disorders

Nicola Pavese
London, United Kingdom

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe different MRI techniques used in movement disorders
  2. Define the role of transcranial sonography in Parkinson’s disease
  3. Describe the contribution of receptor imaging in movement disorders
Session 5312: Update on botulinum toxin treatment

Chairs:
Cynthia Comella
Chicago, IL USA
Erle Chuen-Hian Lim
Singapore

Scientific basis for botulinum toxin therapy

Raymond Rosales
Manila, Philippines

Methods for administering botulinum toxins

Erle Chuen-Hian Lim
Singapore

Case studies: Update on treatment approaches

Roongroj Bhidayasiri
Bangkok, Thailand

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Identify the scientific basis for botulinum toxin therapy and distinguish toxin formulations
  2. Understand methods of administering botulinum toxin including palpation, EMG, ultrasound, and imaging
  3. Discuss treatment paradigms for dystonia and spasticity using patient videos