17th International Congress of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders

Themed Sessions DVD-ROM

17th International Congress Themed Session DVD

MDS is now offering a selection of its Congress educational sessions on DVD, including Teaching Courses and Themed Sessions. Each DVD includes slides, audio and video. The Teaching Course DVD will also include PDFs of accompanying syllabi.

Pricing: MDS Members: $125 USD; MDS Non-Members: $250 USD

*Note each DVD is a DVD-ROM. Read Hardware and System Requirement.

The 17th International Congress Themed Session DVD includes the following sessions:

Session 2103: Clinicopathological correlations in Parkinson’s disease

Chairs:
Stanley Fahn
New York, NY, USA
Andrew Lees
London, United Kingdom

Ante-mortem diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease

Andrew Lees
London, United Kingdom

The natural history of Parkinson’s disease

Mariese Anne Hely
Bowral, Australia

Neuropathological correlations of motor and non-motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease

Peter Kempster
Clayton, Australia

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Understand the main challenges in accurate ante-mortem diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease
  2. Understand the natural history of Parkinson’s disease in the modern era
  3. Understand the neuropathological correlates of motor and non-motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease
Session 2206: Inclusions in Parkinson’s disease: The link between pathology and molecular biology

Chairs:
Glenda Halliday
Randwick, Australia
Yoshikuni Mizuno
Tokyo, Japan

What do monogenic forms of Parkinson’s disease tell us about IPD?

Tamas Revesz
London, United Kingdom

GWAS and pathology: How are they connected?

Tatsushi Toda
Kobe, Japan

Is the Lewy body telling us anything useful about the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease?

Glenda Halliday
Randwick, Australia

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Understand the pathology found in Mendelian forms of Parkinson’s disease and it’s implications for the more common sporadic IPD
  2. Understand how genetic risks for Parkinson’s disease in a population relate to the neuropathology and inclusions found in patients
  3. Understand how the study of the Lewy body gives us a profound insight into the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease
Session 2207: The basal ganglia in health and disease

Chairs:
José Obeso
Pamplona, Spain
John Rothwell
London, United Kingdom

New methods to shed light on the basal ganglia

J. Paul Bolam
Oxford, United Kingdom

Basal ganglia in health

John Rothwell
London, United Kingdom

Basal ganglia in disease

José Obeso
Pamplona, Spain

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Understand the concepts of novel methods now available for investigating basal ganglia function
  2. Understand the normal functions of the basal ganglia
  3. Discuss how basal ganglia dysfunction leads to hypo and hyperkinetic movement disorders
Session 2407: How to develop and run a brain bank

In this interactive session, the faculty will review the objectives and relevancy of brain banks in the field of movement disorders.  Faculty will also address questions related with the registry of clinical data, recruitment of participants and the technical details of processing brains donated for research and the ethical principles safeguarding the running of a brain bank

Chairs:
Dennis Dickson
Jacksonville, FL, USA
Jillian Kril
Sydney, Australia

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe the structure of a brain bank
  2. Recognize the technicalities in collecting, storing and distributing brain and other tissues for research
  3. Discuss the contribution of brain banks to progress in movement disorders
Session 3103: The Pathophysiology of hyperkinetic movement disorders

Chairs:
David Brooks
London, United Kingdom
Ryuki Kaji
Tokushima City, Japan

Lessons learned from neurophysiology

Robert Chen
Toronto, ON, Canada

Images from functional images

David Brooks
London, United Kingdom

What has neuropathology taught us about hyperkinetic movement disorders?

Jean Paul Vonsattel
New York, NY, USA

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe how neurophysiological studies improve our understanding of hyperkinetic movement disorders
  2. Understand the anatomical and functional networks underlying hyperkinetic movement disorders
  3. Understand the neuropathological correlations of hyperkinetic disorders
Session 3207: Corticobasal syndrome: Clinical, neuroanatomical and genetic perspectives

Chairs:
Anthony Lang
Toronto, ON, Canada
Irene Litvan
La Jolla, CA, USA

CBS features that predict the underlying pathologies

Helen Ling
London, United Kingdom

Accuracy in diagnosing CBD: Newly proposed clinical diagnostic criteria

Melissa Armstrong
Baltimore, MD, USA

Genotype/Phenotype in CBS

Adam Boxer
San Francisco, CA, USA

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Identify CBS features that may best predict underlying cortical pathology
  2. Learn newly developed clinical diagnostic criteria for CBD
  3. Understand the role of genetics in the development of the various pathologies that present with a CBS
Session 3208: The mysteries of dopamine in health and disease

Chairs:
Yves Agid
Paris, France
D. James Surmeier
Chicago, IL, USA

How does dopamine control motor function work in the normal brain?

D. James Surmeier
Chicago, IL, USA

Dopamine deficiency at different ages: From dystonia to parkinsonism: Why?

Joel Perlmutter
St. Louis, MO, USA

Dopamine beyond movement

Yves Agid
Paris, France

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Understand the role of dopamine in motor control
  2. Describe the extent of dopamine pathology in untreated and treated Parkinson’s disease
  3. Discuss the extent to which abnormalities in dopamine cause different movement disorders at different ages
Session 3209: Challenging the experts: Movement disorders clinicopathological correlations

In this session, four experienced movement disorders specialists will take the audience through a clinical case with video documentation in order to highlight how they interpret the history and signs in patients with complex movement disorders. Following the clinical discussion, expert neuropathologists will demonstrate the key pathological findings, both the diagnostic features and those features of particular pertinence to the clinical phenomenology of the case. This session will highlight the importance of clinicopathological correlation in helping to understand the relationships between brain structure and function, and pathological change in the brain and disease.

Chairs:
Victor Fung
Westmead, Australia
Glenda Halliday
Randwick, Australia

MDS Panel of Experts:

Francisco Cardoso
Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Timothy Lynch
Dublin, Ireland
Barry Snow
Auckland, New Zealand
Eduardo Tolosa
Barcelona, Spain

Neuropathologists:
Dennis Dickson
Jacksonville, FL, USA
Janice Holton
London, United Kingdom
Tamas Revesz
London, United Kingdom
Jean Paul Vonsattel
New York, NY, USA

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Understand the relationship between movement disorder symptoms and signs and the location of cerebral pathology
  2. Enhance knowledge of clinicopathological correlations in unusual movement disorder syndromes
  3. Learn how the experts use clinical history and signs to formulate their diagnosis in complex movement disorder cases
Session 3406: How to assess cognitive function in parkinsonian syndromes

In this interactive session, the faculty will review the clinical specrum of cognitive symptoms associated with the different parkinsonian syndromes. The faculty will also describe brief and simple cognitive tests and more formal tests for conducting a cognitive assessment.  Cognitive assessments will be appraised based on their applicability for the screening for cognitive impairment, differential diagnosis, rating of severity or monitoring disease progression.

Chairs:
John Dalrymple-Alford
Christchurch, New Zealand
Elsdon Storey
Melbourne, Australia

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Review the spectrum of cognitive symptoms in parkinsonian syndrome
  2. Discuss the clinicopathological correlates of cognitive dysfunction
  3. Appraise the cognitive assessments in parkinsonian syndromes
Session 3509: Movement disorders: Surprises in localization or pathology

In this interactive session, the faculty will review videos and possible imaging/pathology of movement disorders that have been caused by unusual lesions or unexpected anatomical sites. The session will discuss lessons learned from these cases in understanding basal ganglia pathophysiology.

Chairs:
Asha Kishore
Trivandrum, India
Susanne Schneider
Kiel, Germany

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Review unusual causes of common movement disorders
  2. Understand how lesions in the basal ganglia give rise to particular movement disorders
  3. Develop a logical method to help evaluate unusual movement disorders
Session 4208: Multiple system atrophy: A wolf in sheep’s clothing

Chairs:
Richard Boyle
Brisbane, Australia
Gregor Wenning
Innsbruck, Austria

Challenges in the ante-mortem diagnosis of multiple system atrophy

Tetsutaro Ozawa
Niigata, Japan

Update on the pathological correlates of autonomic features

Eduardo Benarroch
Rochester, MN, USA

Molecular pathogenesis and animal models

Gregor Wenning
Innsbruck, Austria

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Understand the main challenges in accurate ante-mortem diagnosis of MSA
  2. Recognize the spectrum of non-motor symptoms in MSA
  3. Understand the latest developments in the pathogenesis and therapeutic frontiers in MSA
Session 4209: What’s new in essential and non-essential tremor?

Chairs:
Günther Deuschl
Kiel, Germany
Eng-King Tan
Singapore

The natural history of essential tremor: Lessons from clinical and physiological studies

Jan Raethjen
Kiel, Germany

The pathology of essential tremor

Holly Shill
Sun City, AZ, USA

Pathophysiological basis of other tremor

Rick Helmich
Nijmegen, Netherlands

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Describe the current clinical definitions, its problems as well as the evolving phenotype in the course of the disease and with increasing age and its pathophysiological correlates
  2. Discuss the pros and cons for neurodegenerative processes in essential tremor, possible correlations with the clinical spectrum and alternative explanations for the pathological changes observed. The latest in genetics will also be covered
  3. Understand tremor circuitry by analyzing how a lesion can either induce or relieve a tremor
Session 5207: Regional atypical parkinsonian syndromes

Chairs:
Irene Litvan
La Jolla, CA, USA
Huw Morris
Cardiff, United Kingdom

Clinical features of the atypical parkinsonian syndromes in Guam, Japan and Guadeloupe: Similarities and differences

John Steele
Tamuning, Guam

Underlying pathology and proposed etiopathogenesis

Annie Lannuzel
Pointe-à-Pitre, France

The link between the atypical parkinsonian syndromes in the Pacific and PSP, corticobasal syndrome and FTD/ALS

Huw Morris
Cardiff, United Kingdom

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants should be better able to:

  1. Understand the clinical features of atypical parkinsonian syndrome in Guam, Japan and Guadeloupe
  2. Understand the underlying pathology and proposed etiopathogenesis of these disorders
  3. Understand potential links between these disorders and PSP, CBD and FTD/ALS