Website Edition: December 2009/January 2010

Moving Along: The Newsletter of The Movement Disorder Society

By Mark Stacy, MD and Carlo Colosimo, MD, Co-Editors

colosimoThe Moving Along Newsletter has been in existence for the last decade. Its purpose is to inform the Society of activities pertinent to our subspecialty throughout the world. The major priorities include the posting of scholarly and policy meetings, and providing professional notices and job openings. This publication also provides space for messages from the President of the Society, as well as Chairs of the European, Asian-Oceanian and Pan American sections. In addition, space will be available for members to outline the clinical and research activities in specific regions or countries.

"Controversies in Movement Disorders" has remained a popular column for each issue. There are plans to continue providing summaries of controversial discussion from topics and presenters from the annual MDS meetings. In the future, topics will reach to the more practical clinical questions surrounding the everyday practice. We are hopeful that discussions of presymptomatic genetic testing, levodopa delay, early DBS in Parkinson's disease, differences between botulinum toxins and other topics will facilitate discussion among peers, and better inform our patients.

stacyTo parallel the growth of our international community, several new features have been added. The column "Where are They Now" will focus on people important in the emergence of Movement Disorders as a major discipline of Neurology. These brief articles will consist of interviews of pioneers in Movement Disorders, and will emphasize the globalization of the MDS, with reports on how "discoveries" in one country may have changed practices in another.

Professor Oleh Hornykiewicz reminisced about dopamine in the last issue, while Professor Roger Duvoisin shares his memories of his training, how levodopa "changed everything," and the evolution from twin studies to the Contursi kindred in the next installment. Interviews with Dr. Hornykiewicz and Dr. Duvoisin also provided a rich history of reminiscences and amusing stories of past giants in the field, and Moving Along will find a way to share appropriate contributions.

Please contact us if you have an interest in submitting an article, funny story (or picture) or a suggestion for a topic to be included in Moving Along. We also invite any reader to send a list of Top 5 books in Neurology; Top 5 books in Movement Disorders; Top 5 Fiction Books; and Top 5 nonfiction books. It will be fun to see what we are reading. You may send your choices to either mark.stacy@duke.edu or carlo.colosimo@uniroma1.it
 

To have your books included in the new Book Section of the MDS website, e-mail .