MDS-AOS Digital Technology Primer for Neurologists: the Changing World of Practices in Parkinson's disease

 

Lectures and associated resources available October 10, 2020
Live Q&A session October 17, 2020 at 10:00-11:00 GMT (17:00 ICT / 18:00 China Standard Time)

 

Register

Course Director

Roongroj Bhidayasiri, MD, FRCP, FRCPI

Faculty

Roongroj Bhidayasiri, MD, FRCP, FRCPI (course director)

Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence for Parkinson’s Disease and Related Movement Disorders, Chulalongkorn University
Bangkok, Thailand

Alberto J. Espay, MD, MSc

University of Cincinnati Gardner Neuroscience Institute, Gardner Center for Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders
Cincinnati, Ohio, United States of America

Walter Maetzler, MD, PhD

University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein
Kiel, Germany

Onanong Phokaewvarangkul, MD, PhD

Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence for Parkinson’s Disease and Related Movement Disorders, Chulalongkorn University
Bangkok, Thailand

Peerapon Vateekul, PhD

Chulalongkorn University
Bangkok, Thailand

Do-Young Kwon, MD, PhD

Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan Hospital
Seoul, South Korea

Chou Ching Lin, MD, PhD

Medical Device and Technology at National Taiwan University Hospital
Taipei, Taiwan

 
Course Description

The past decade has seen many advances in medical technology, especially in the field of Parkinson’s disease, using variable sensors, mobile technologies, cloud computing, data analytics and easy-to-use devices. From capturing individual patient’s data for accurate diagnosis and precise treatment, to pooling data from various devices and institutions for analytics, technology can have a prominent role in the future of Parkinson’s disease care. One of the major problems in developing these technologies is the crosstalk between users and creators. Neurologists have limited knowledge and understanding of the techniques and options in creating these technologies, and vice versa, engineers have difficulties and limited understanding in the field of medicine. This course intends to overcome this problem and bridge the two groups.

The goal of this technology course for neurologists is to learn basic knowledge about terminologies used in the tech world, understanding basics of technologies and their possible application in Parkinson’s disease care. For engineers and computer scientists, this course will introduce them to medical terminologies, basic understanding of Parkinson’s disease and needs for technology development in this area. Hence, this course is a unique blend of technology and Parkinson’s disease where neurologists and engineers learn and educate each other.

Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  • Understand technology terms and concepts relevant to medical uses and medical technology development, such as, sensors, big data, machine learning, and artificial intelligence.
  • Understand available technology for Parkinson’s disease assessment and their challenges.
  • Understand engineering concepts in technology development and data acquisition.
  • For engineers, to understand basic medical knowledge and needs in technology development.
     

All course materials and lectures will be available for “on-demand” viewing starting on October 10, 2020.

Interactive Components

There will be an Interactive Question and Answer session with lecturers, and registered participants will have an opportunity to submit their questions to the faculty panel in advance or during the interactive session.

The interactive Question and Answer session will be on Saturday, October 17, 2020 at 10:00-11:00 GMT (17:00 ICT / 18:00 China Standard Time)

Target Audience
  • Movement disorders specialists, general neurologists, internists, physiatrists and allied healthcare professionals. 
  • Biomedical scientists, bioengineers, computer engineers, and data scientists. 
     
Learning Objectives 
  1. Change in healthcare professionals’ perceptions about potential benefits and challenges of technology in the management of Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders.
  2. After gaining more understanding and insights into technology, more researchers would endeavor to advance technology development in the field of movement disorders.
  3. After gaining more understanding in the field of movement disorders, more engineers and data scientists would endeavor to advance technology development in the field of movement disorders.
  4. Increased collaboration between health professionals and technology people.
     
Program
Lecture Title Faculty Member Duration of Lecture

Digital Phenotyping in Parkinson’s disease: Empowering Neurologists for Measurement-Based Care

Roongroj Bhidayasiri, MD, FRCP, FRCPI
Bangkok, Thailand

30 min

Adopting Technology-Based Assessments in Parkinson’s disease: Steps Towards Integrative Care and Research

Alberto J. Espay, MD, MSc
Cincinnati, Ohio, United States

30 min

Physiological Data Acquisition and Data Analytics for Neurologists

Chou Ching Lin, MD, PhD
Taipei, Taiwan

30 min

Overview of AI-Assisted Techniques and Deep Learning Methods: What Neurologists Should Know?

Peerapon Vateekul, PhD
Bangkok, Thailand

30 min

Sensor-Based Applications in Parkinson’s disease: What, How, and When to Measure?

Alberto J. Espay, MD, MSc
Cincinnati, Ohio, United States

30 min

Patient-Centered Digital Outcome Measures: Concept, Design and Validation

Walter Maetzler, MD
Kiel, Germany

30 min

Public Health in the Time of COVID-19; Lessons Learned and Future Implications of Telemedicine in Parkinson’s disease

Onanong Phokaewvarangkul, MD, PhD
Bangkok, Thailand

30 min

How Digital Health Technology Can Help Manage Parkinson’s disease During COVID-19 Outbreak

Do-Young Kwon, MD, PhD
Seoul, South Korea 

30 min

 

Accreditation Statement:

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME). The International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation Statement:

The International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society designates this activity for a maximum of 4.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation.

Satisfactory Completion:

Participants must complete an evaluation for each session they attend to receive continuing medical education credit. Your chosen session(s) must be attended in their entirety. Partial credit for individual sessions is not available.

Content Validity Statement:

All recommendations involving clinical medicine in MDS activities are based on evidence that is accepted within the profession of medicine as adequate justification for their indications and contraindications in the case of patients. All scientific research referred to, reported or used in CME in support or justification of a patient care recommendations conforms to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection and analysis. Activities that promote recommendations, treatment or manners of practicing medicine not within the definition of CME or are knowing to have risks or dangers that outweigh the benefits or are knowing to be ineffective in the treatment of patients do not constitute valid CME.

Disclosure of Financial Relationships:

All individuals in control of content for this webinar are required to disclose all relevant financial relationships with commercial interests as defined by the ACCME.

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