Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson’s Disease – Psychiatric Complications (SCOPA-PC)

Acronym: SCOPA-PC

Authors: Visser M, Verbaan D, van Rooden SM, Stiggelbout AM, Marinus J, van Hilten JJ.

The SCales for Outcomes in PArkinson’s disease-Psychiatric Complications (SCOPA-PC) is a reliable, valid, and easily administered semistructured questionnaire that addresses both psychotic and compulsive complications in Parkinson’s disease. The SCOPA-PC consists of seven items addressing psychotic (5 items) and compulsive behavior (2 items): “Hallucinations,” “Illusions,” “Paranoid ideation,” “Altered dream phenomena,” “Confusion,” “Sexual preoccupation,” and “Compulsive behavior”. Each item is rated on a scale from 0 (no symptoms) to 3 (severe symptoms). The SCOPA-PC total score has a range from 0 to 21, with higher scores reflecting more psychiatric complications.

The development of the SCOPA-PC is part of a larger research project, the SCales for Outcomes in PArkinson’s disease (SCOPA), in which practical and clinimetric sound instruments for all relevant regions in PD are selected or developed. The SCOPA instruments were originally developed in the Dutch language. 

Original PublicationView the Instrument (PDF)  

Year Published: 2007

Instrument Last Updated: Unchanged since publication

Instrument Type: ClinRO

Estimated Time to Complete: 5-10 minutes but can vary depending on the number and severity of psychiatric symptoms.

Available Translations:

  • Brazilian
  • Dutch
  • German-Austria
  • German-Germany
  • German-Switzerland
  • Spanish
     

Related Publications:

Carod‐Artal FJ, Martinez‐Martin P, Vargas AP. Independent validation of SCOPA–psychosocial and metric properties of the PDQ‐39 Brazilian version. Movement Disorders. 2007 Jan; 22(1): 91-98.

Evans A., Okai D, Weintraub D, Lim S, O'Sullivan SS, Voon V, Krack P, Sampaio C, Post B, Leentjens AF, Martinez‐Martin P, Stebbins GT, Goetz CG, Schrag A. Scales to assess impulsive and compulsive behaviors in Parkinson's disease: Critique and recommendations. Movement Disorders. 2019 May; 34(6): 791-798. 

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