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International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society
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In memoriam Ying-Zu Huang, MD, PhD

Obituary written by Yih-Ru Wu on behalf of the Taiwan Movement Disorders Society

Prof. Ying-Zu Huang, age 55, passed away on April 13, 2021. He graduated from Taipei Medical University in 1991, and then received his Master of Science degree at National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan. From 2001-2004 he received his PhD at Institute of Neurology, University College London, University of London. During that period, he and his mentor professor Rothwell invented the theta burst repetitive transmagnetic stimulation (rTMS). After his returning to Taiwan, he established the best rTMS lab in Taiwan and devoted to promote Non-invasive Brain Stimulation (NiBS) in the country. Over the past few years, Taiwan has developed dramatically in this field and has been highly recognized in IFCN (International Federation of Clinical Neurology). The high visibility of Professor Huang’s contribution, is worthy of credit. Professor Huang was an active member of Taiwan movement disorder society and has served as an executive member for 6 years.

Those who knew Professor Huang were impressed by his academic enthusiasm. Even during his illness, I have seen him post on Facebook to share information about movement disorders and NiBS academic activities. He held an online course entitled “MDS-AOS How Clinical Physiology and Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Help Diagnosis and Treatment for Parkinson's Disease”last August and gave speeches at various medical associations several times. He was talking and laughing happily. He always used his wisdom and humor to explain difficult and complicated content in a simple way, so that everyone could understand. He was so brave as he faced his illness and he was an excellent model of clinical neuroscientist in Taiwan and MDS AOS region. Now Professor Huang’s voice is vivid, but we will never hear such a brilliant speech again. It is really a great loss in our society.

We mourn the passing of Professor Huang, may he rest in peace. Although everyone is sad, we will continue to move forward with his spirit and enthusiasm.